What Age Is Best For Your Child’s First Visit To The Dentist?

Child's First Visit To The Dentist | dentist | parenting | dental health | kids dental health | health | kids health

One of the things new parents often wonder about is what age is best for a child’s first visit to the dentist? You might think you don’t need to worry about it for awhile, but you might be surprised at how soon you actually do need to worry about it. Today we have the answer for this question so you’re prepared when the time comes.

Child's First Visit To The Dentist | dentist | parenting | dental health | kids dental health | health | kids health

What Age Is Best For Your Child’s First Visit To The Dentist?

It used to be that most parents waited until about age 2 or 3 to take their child to the dentist for the first time. But as it turns out, that is waiting too long! The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry now recommends that your child’s first visit to the dentist happen within 6 months after their first tooth appears. It definitely needs to be by their first birthday. If that seems a little early, keep reading.

Child's First Visit To The Dentist | dentist | parenting | dental health | kids dental health | health | kids health

Why Your Child Should See The Dentist By Age 1

Myth has it that breastfeeding protects a baby’s first teeth from cavities. It does help protect them from bottle mouth, but even breastfeeding isn’t foolproof. Baby teeth are just as susceptible to cavities as permanent teeth. This is why your child should see the dentist as soon as they have teeth to examine. The dentist can also teach you how to care for your baby’s teeth now and as they grow. This starts a habit of good dental health for a lifetime.

Child's First Visit To The Dentist | dentist | parenting | dental health | kids dental health | health | kids health

Preparing For Your Child’s First Visit To The Dentist

It’s best to schedule your first appointment early, before any problems are evident. This helps ensure that your child’s first visit is a positive experience. When you call the office, try to schedule the appointment at a time of day when your child is most cooperative and agreeable. In other words, avoid nap time!

Work on keeping your own anxiety about the dentist at bay. Let your child see you be calm and positive, and they are more likely to be the same. Be careful not to make going to the dentist a threat. {“If you eat too much candy you’ll have to get shots from the dentist!”} You always want your child to feel happy about going to the dentist!

Is your child sucking their thumb? Thumb-sucking is a threat to good dental health. See how to get your child to stop sucking her thumb.

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